Friday, July 27, 2012

Algorithms And Creativity

Can Creativity be Automated?
Computer algorithms have started to write news stories, compose music, and pick hits...... The process record labels use to find new talent—A&R, for "artists and repertoire"—is fickle and hard to explain ...... an algorithm tasked with finding hit songs. .... hundreds of books and studies that have attempted to explain creativity as the product of mysterious processes within the right side of the human brain. Creativity, the thinking has been, proves just how different people are from CPUs. ..... When Novak submitted a song to McCready's engine through the Web, it was graded on a par with classic hits such as I've Got a Feeling by the Eagles and Steppenwolf's Born to Be Wild.
You may have a hit.
Music X-Ray's algorithms use Fourier transforms—a method of separating a signal from the "noise" of complex data—to isolate a song's base melody, beat, tempo, rhythm, octave, pitch, chords, progression, sonic brilliance, and several other factors that catch a listener's ear. The software then builds three-dimensional models of the song based on these properties and compares it with hit songs of the past. Putting a just-analyzed song on the screen with No. 1 tracks of yore shows a kind of cloud structure filled in with dots representing songs. The hits tend to be grouped in clusters, which reveal similar underlying structures. Get close to the middle of one of those clusters and you may have a hit.
And why, writing also. This bodes well for natural language search and communication, the idea that you can have a conversation with anyone in real time regardless of if they speak your language.
Music lends itself naturally to being parsed by algorithms—mathematics is mixed up in every chord, beat, and harmony that we hear. ..... Bots can't yet script prose worthy of awards, but on some metrics of economic importance to publishers—such as number of page views a site registers—bots can be far more productive than any journalist. They can write articles in seconds ...... his newer ones have consistently composed classical music that imitates masters like Johann Sebastian Bach so well that people can't always tell the difference
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