Monday, November 01, 2010

Mac App Store: Bullshit

Steve Jobs is this genuinely amazing guy who I have fundamental philosophical differences with. After having replaced the browser with apps on his smartphone he has started to talk in terms of an app store also for the Mac computer. We are going backwards in time, folks, if we keep following the pied piper.

Instead we need to be moving towards an agnostic browser. It should be the browser on your laptop, the browser on your tablet, and the browser on your smartphone. The browser on the smartphone should be able to realize your screen is much smaller, and so it should serve the mobile web version of that same site. That way a-l-l smartphones would serve you just fine. You should not need 300,000 iPhone apps, you need 30 billion mobile ready websites.

Steve Jobs was, is, and always will be a PC guy. He is not a web guy. Bill Gates is not either. Steve Jobs keeps wanting to go back to the PC concept. The web is just something extra. The web is not where the action is.

That is why I love Google like some people love Apple. Google tells me the web is the only place where the action is.

Granted we will have to get into the era of ubiquitous wireless broadband, much faster broadband, for the browser to take over the small screen as well, but that time will come.

HTML 5, not Mac apps, come on, people.
New York Times: Proclaimed Dead, Web Is Showing New Life: the growth of walled gardens like Apple’s applications store have threatened the “generative” character of the Internet, which has permitted users to build on what is already there, as with Lego toys..... Every day, about a million new devices — computers, mobile phones, televisions and other things — are hooked up to the Internet .... developing countries, where the Web is dominant .... The number of Web pages has grown from 26 million in 1998 to more than a trillion today .... the recent opening up of the domain name system to non-Western languages. .... The popularity of applications for smartphones, often with content or features similar to those available on open Web sites, could steer more toward private digital gardens, like those that existed in the heyday of online services like CompuServe and Prodigy. .... the nightmare outlook is one in which telecommunications companies, allied with other corporate partners, seize control of the Internet and run it in a way that maximizes profits, rather than openness .... I think this is one of the most precious things we have ever built as a civilization ..... network neutrality is a largely American issue, rooted in a lack of competition among broadband providers .... the idea that the desktop and the mobile Internet exist in two different spheres may turn out to be merely a temporary phenomenon .... Much of the content in mobile applications is scoured and repackaged from the Web ... the Web has been winning fairly big time

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